samedi 7 décembre 2013


280 dead in latest violence since Muslim coup in Central African Republic

The Islamic coup and burgeoning genocide ignored by the media.

Some quick background: Violence Escalates In Central African Republic; U.N. OKs Troops

Brutal sectarian violence has engulfed the mostly Christian country since March, when the first Muslim leader assumed power after a coup.

Armed gangs of Muslim extremists joined by mercenaries from neighboring countries now control most of the country.

Seleka fighters reportedly have swollen to 25,000 strong since a few thousand helped former rebel leader Michel Djotodia seize power. Djotodia says he no longer has any control over them.

The U.N. estimates at least 400,000 people — nearly one-tenth of the population — have been displaced. Rape is rampant. UNICEF says thousands of children are being forced to fight.

Slaughter, rape and torture are widely reported.

Armed Christian forces are fighting back.

Yesterday via Thousands seek refuge at Central African airport – KSFY News

BANGUI, Central African Republic (AP)

– Thousands of Christian civilians sought refuge at an airport guarded by French soldiers Friday, fleeing from the mostly Muslim ex-rebels with machetes and guns who rule the country a day after the worst violence to hit the chaotic capital in nine months.

When several French helicopters landed at the airport, people sang with joy as they banged on plastic buckets and waved rags into the air in celebration.

Outside the barbed wire fences of the airport, bodies lay decomposing along the roads in a capital too dangerous for many to collect the corpses. Thursday’s clashes left at least 280 dead, according to national radio, and have raised fears that waves of retaliatory attacks could soon follow.

“They are slaughtering us like chickens,” said Appolinaire Donoboy, a Christian whose family remained in hiding.

France had pledged to increase its presence in its former colony well before Christian militias attacked the capital at dawn Thursday. The arrival of additional French troops and equipment came as the capital teetered on the brink of total anarchy and represented the greatest hope for many Central Africans.

About 1,000 French forces were expected to be on the ground by Friday evening, a French defense official said on condition of anonymity because he wasn’t authorized to speak publicly on the matter.

As night fell across the near anarchic capital, Christians fearing retaliatory attacks by the mostly Muslim ex-rebels crowded as close to the runway as possible, laying out their woven mats in front of a barbed wire coiled fence. National radio announced that at least 280 people had died, citing figures from local Red Cross officials.

The U.S. State Department said it was “deeply concerned” by the violence and praised France’s quick intervention.

France signaled its amped up presence in its former colony on Friday by sending out armored vehicles to patrol the streets. A French fighter jet made several flyovers, roaring through the sky over an otherwise lifeless capital as civilians cowered at home. Britain also flew in a C-17 plane Friday loaded with equipment to help with France’s intervention.

As many as 250 French troops are carrying out permanent patrols in Bangui, and “we didn’t notice any direct clashes between armed groups today,” said French military spokesman Col. Gilles Jaron in Paris.

On Thursday, however, 10 armed attackers in a pickup truck fired on a French position at the airport, including with a rocket-propelled grenade whose charge did not detonate. French forces returned fire, killing four attackers and wounding six, Jaron said.

A planned vote on a U.N. Security Council resolution Thursday allowed France to proceed with its mission. It coincided with the worst violence to roil the capital since March when the mostly Muslim rebels known as Seleka overthrew the president of a decade.

On Thursday, Christian militias believed to be loyal to ousted leader Francois Bozize attacked the city, and hours of gunbattles ensued.

No worries though. Assistant Secretary for the Bureau of African Affairs (U.S.) Linda Thomas-Greenfield says we need to deal with the Muslims “grievances”.

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